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About Nude Art Photography

Subgenres and Subjets

“Feminine nudity must be given to men by the teaspoonful, not with a scoop.” (Coco Chanel)

Nude photography divides into three basic forms: the “classic” full nude with a simple background, full nude model where model is completely naked; the detailed nude depicting certain details of the body, abstracting and making them anonymous, and emphasising the forms and structures of the nude; and finally the half nude, where the model is partially clothed or partially wrapped with accessories.

History and development

The nude is a classic subject in art. Already the early high cultures (Egypt, Crete, India among others) knew nude representations. Its development into other representation forms can be pursued from Greek clay to the art of the middle ages and on to the European art of the modern age. Since the renaissance, the study of the nude human body is an intrinsic part of art education at art academies.

Since around 1847 the nude has also become the object of photography, the first nude photographers including Philippe Debussy, E. Delacroix, Eugene Durieu and B. Braquehais. Models were both professionals and prostitutes and photographs were both artistic and “spicy”, which often invited the aversion of moral and law enforcement officers.

Important Nude Photographers

o	Bettina Rheims 					     David Bailey 

o	Eric Kroll 						Helmut Newton 

o	Hans-Peter Muff 					

o	Jan Saudek Meister der Koloriertechnik (kolorieren) 

o	Jeanloup Sieff 						Man Ray 

o	Paul Outerbridge 					Petter Hegre 

o	Richard Kern 						Roy Stuart 

o	Robert Mapplethorpe 					Sam Haskins 

o	Uwe Ommer 						G√ľnter Blum